Care Planning

Managing Emotions When The Going Gets Tough

This session is intended for Caregivers

How can uncomfortable emotions be managed when caregiving feels unmanageable? Is it ever possible to make peace with grief and loss in caregiving?

Re-framing grief and anxiety as natural components of loving relationships with dependent loved ones is the theme of this presentation.

The session will offer caregivers tools to better understand and manage their own grief and anxiety. Questions addressed during this session will include: Is it possible to befriend grief and anxiety?  What happens if you try to shut these feelings out? What is the difference between difficult emotions that are natural and those that are symptoms of mental illness? What are the tools to feel better and keep caregiving?

The purpose of this session is to help caregivers understand the nature of their own difficult emotions and to offer self-management strategies that enable resilience and wellbeing in the face of loss and challenge.

 This presentation will be followed by a question/answer period.

 

  1. Donna Thomson cares for her adult son with severe disabilities and for her Mom who is still feisty at 93. She's the author of The Four Walls of My Freedom: Lessons I've Learned From a Life of Caregiving (The House of Anansi Press, 2014) and blogs regularly at The Caregivers' Living Room (www.donnathomson.com). Donna is the Caregiving Advisor for Tyze Personal Networks, a free online tool designed to help caregivers coordinate a network of support.

  1. Julie’s career path changed and evolved after becoming a mother herself to Meredith, in December 2003. While no longer a practicing birth doula, Julie is active in the death midwifery movement and now offers care to those at the end of life. She welcomed a new opportunity in 2012 when she became a licensed marriage officiant for the province of Ontario, and expanded her services after graduating as a Certified Life-Cycle Celebrant® in early 2013 from the Celebrant Foundation & Institute with a focus on end-of-life and funeral celebrations. An avid writer, Julie began work on her first book, an extension of her essay, What I Would Tell You, in 2011. Her book was published and released to the world in May 2015 and has been very well received by not only parents and the professionals who work with families like hers but also by anyone who has found themselves in a caregiving role.

2 Comments

  1. I’m a caregiver to my 71 year old spouse who has Alzheimer’s and is a permanent resident in a long term care facility(3 years). We have been married for 53 years. She is looked after, but it is a huge loss for me.I’m trying to “Let Go Without Giving Up Caring and this AMBIGUITY is confusing feelings.
    Look forward to presentation.

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